Tony Bennett, DetroitStockCity.com

Events

Tue March 9 2021 • 12:00 PM — 12:50 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
M-LEEaD CEC and IHSC Webinar Series: “Energy Equity: Health Impact Assessment of Detroit Energy's Integrated Resource Plan”
Description: Speakers: Michelle Martinez (Michigan Environmental Justice Coalition); Carina Gronlund (University of Michigan School of Public Health); Tony Reames (University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability)
Sponsored by: Co-sponsored by: DEI Committee, Health Behavior and Health Education; DEI Committee, Department of Environmental Health Sciences
Location: This is an online event. Please see flyer for more information.
Tue March 16 2021 • 7:00 PM — 8:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Environmental Research Seminar: “TSCA @5 Years: Opportunities to Act with Foresight”
Webpage: http://mleead.umich.edu/Event_ForeverChemicals_2021.php
Register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfuKEufCLIZ_xnF3XYoZ1XTa9hFosEuxlKSrV0rBh7JMWxw6w/viewform
Description: Watch the documentary: The Emmy-winning documentary “The Forever Chemicals” examines the impact of PFAS contamination in west Michigan communities: private wells that tapped into groundwater near industrial dump sites were delivering PFAS-laden drinking water to unsuspecting residents for years until the contamination was detected and reported publicly. Join the discussion: Speakers include Sandra Svoboda (“The Forever Chemicals” co-producer and Great Lakes Now Program Director), Tracey Woodruff, PhD, MPH (Professor, Ob/Gyn, Reproductive Sciences, UCSF), Justin Onwenu (Environmental Justice Organizer, Sierra Club), Patricia Koman, MPP, PhD (Research Investigator, Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan); welcoming remarks from Gilbert S. Omenn, MD, PhD, (Harold T. Shapiro Distinguished University Professor, School of Public Health, UM). Please register for the discussion on March 16.
Location: This is an online event. See event webpage for more information.
Tue March 23 2021 • 12:00 PM — 12:50 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
M-LEEaD CEC and IHSC Webinar Series: “Water and Health”
Description: Speakers: Monica Lewis-Patrick (We the People of Detroit); Nadia Gaber (We the People of Detroit); Emily Kutil (Lawrence Technological University)
Sponsored by: Co-sponsored by: DEI Committee, Health Behavior and Health Education; DEI Committee, Department of Environmental Health Sciences
Location: This is an online event. Please see flyer for more information.
Tue March 30 2021 • 12:00 PM — 12:50 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
M-LEEaD CEC and IHSC Webinar Series: “Climate Hazards, Housing and Health in Detroit”
Description: Speakers: Marie O’Neill University of Michigan School of Public Health); Zachary Rowe (Friends of Parkside)
Sponsored by: Co-sponsored by: DEI Committee, Health Behavior and Health Education; DEI Committee, Department of Environmental Health Sciences
Location: This is an online event. Please see flyer for more information.
Tue April 13 2021 • 12:00 PM — 12:50 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
M-LEEaD CEC and IHSC Webinar Series: “Environmental Racism and Environmental Justice”
Description: Speakers: Donele Wilkins, CEO, Green Door Initiative and Kathryn Savoie, Detroit Community Health Director, Ecology Center
Sponsored by: Co-sponsored by: DEI Committee, Health Behavior and Health Education; DEI Committee, Department of Environmental Health Sciences
Location: This is an online event. Please see flyer for more information.
Tue April 20 2021 • 12:00 PM — 12:50 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Note: Rescheduled from February 9
M-LEEaD CEC and IHSC Webinar Series: “Community Action to Promote Healthy Environments: Research to Improve Air Quality and Health in Detroit”
Description: Speakers: Amy Schulz (University of Michigan); Stuart Batterman (University of Michigan); Angela Reyes (Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation)
Sponsored by: Co-sponsored by: DEI Committee, Health Behavior and Health Education; DEI Committee, Department of Environmental Health Sciences
Location: This is an online event. Please check back for more information.

Community Events

PLEASE NOTE: These events are not associated with M-LEEaD but may be of interest to our audience.

No community events scheduled.
Please check back for future events.

Previous Events

PLEASE NOTE: Many previous events are recorded and archived on our Multimedia page.

Tue March 2 2021 • 12:00 PM — 12:50 PM
Environmental Research Seminar: “In Support with Communities: Early Career Equity and Environmental Health Perspectives” with Jamaji C Nwanaji-Enwerem, PhD (MD/MPP Candidate, Harvard University; Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, University of California, Berkeley)
Description: This talk will take listeners through a series of environmental health research studies that have been contextualized by early career equity experiences. Projects to be discussed include work done in the United States and Nigeria. A discussion with Jamaji C Nwanaji-Enwerem, PhD (MD/MPP Candidate, Harvard University; Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, University of California, Berkeley). Moderator: Sung Kyun Park, ScD (Associate Professor, Epidemiology; Associate Professor, Environmental Health Sciences; University of Michigan School of Public Health).
Thu February 25 2021 • 10:00 AM — 2:30 PM
26th Annual Environmental Health Sciences Research Symposium: “Resilience in the Face of Crisis: An Environmental Health Perspective”
Description: The theme of this year’s symposium is Resilience in the Face of Crisis: An Environmental Health Perspective. Responsive in large part to the pandemic, recent climate change-related events and other issues of environmental justice, it will feature work addressing environmental crises at various levels: individual, community, policy and ecological. We are excited to welcome speakers Dr. Abdul El-Sayed (epidemiologist, physician, civil servant, and DeRoy Visiting Professor at University of Michigan), Dr. Cathrine Hoyo (Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and Director of the Epidemiology and Environmental Epigenomics Laboratory at North Carolina State University), and Dr. Christopher Golden (Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Planetary Health at Harvard University School of Public Health). All attendees will have the opportunity to participate in breakout conversations with speakers. A poster session highlighting graduate student research provides further opportunities to network and learn.
Fri February 12 2021 • 1:00 PM — 4:00 PM
M-LEEaD Symposium: “Innovations in Relating Real Life Exposures to Chemicals and Chemical Mixtures to Health Outcomes”
Description: We have an exciting lineup of speakers and panelists, so please mark the date on your calendars and register for the event using the link above.
1:00-1:05 pm - Introduction
1:05-1:35 pm - Dr. Andreas Kortenkamp
Professor in Human Molecular Toxicology at Brunel University
“Male reproductive health – a bad cocktail of endocrine disruptors”
Traditional chemicals risk assessment has a quite artificial orientation: It treats chemicals as if they act in isolation, when in reality there is exposure to multiple substances. For more than 15 years, Dr. Kortenkamp's team has been engaged in efforts to find ways of improving risk assessment by taking “cocktail effects” into account. This work has proceeded in stages: Firstly, when we have information about the toxicity of individual mixture components, is it possible to predict the effects of the combination? Working with mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals we have shown that this is achievable. Secondly, what is the composition of mixtures of environmental relevance, and what effects do they produce? Work on this aspect of the mixtures issue is currently proceeding in our group. We are also interested in making an impact on chemical regulation by addressing the questions: Which chemicals should be grouped together for mixtures risk assessment? What are scientifically sound grouping criteria? Dr. Kortenkamp's team has prepared scientific reports for the European Commission, including the State of the Art Report on Mixture Toxicology. Currently they are writing a State of the Art Assessment for Endocrine Disrupters, a project also commissioned by the European Commission.
1:35-2:05 pm - Dr. Jodi Flaws
Professor in Comparative Biosciences at the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign
“Applying real life phthalate mixtures from an Illinois pregnancy cohort to toxicological models”
She received a B.S. in Biology from St. Xavier University, a M.S. in Biology from Loyola University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. in Physiology from the University of Arizona. Following completion of the Ph.D. degree, Dr. Flaws performed postdoctoral research at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland. Following postdoctoral training, Dr. Flaws accepted an Assistant Professor position at the University of Maryland, where she subsequently was promoted to Associate Professor. In 2006, Dr. Flaws accepted a position as Professor of Comparative Biosciences at the University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign. Dr. Flaws’ research program is mainly focused on determining the mechanisms by which environmental chemicals affect the development and function of the ovary. Her research is funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health. She has published over 250 peer-reviewed papers that have involved extensive participation and authorship by graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, veterinary medical students, and undergraduate students. She is the recipient of the Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland Student Mentoring Award, the Patricia Sokolove Outstanding Mentor Award, the Dr. Gordon and Mrs. Helen Kruger Research Excellence Award, the Pfizer Animal Health Award for Research Excellence, the University Scholar Award, the Women in Toxicology Mentoring Award from the Society of Toxicology, and the Society for the Study of Reproduction Trainee Mentor Award.
2:05-2:35 pm - Dr. Laura Vandenberg
Associate Professor of Environmental Health Sciences and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, School of Public Health and Health Sciences
“The mammary gland is a sensitive organ: lessons learned from fracking chemical mixtures”
Trained as a developmental biologist and endocrinologist, Dr. Vandenberg’s laboratory research examines the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals on function and disease of the mammary gland, and on maternal behaviors. Outside of the lab, her research critically evaluates issues that affect risk and hazard assessments for endocrine disrupting chemicals including low dose effects, non-monotonic dose responses, and methods used to evaluate chemical hazards. Dr. Vandenberg is an author on more than 95 peer reviewed papers and ten book chapters.
2:35-3:05 pm - Dr. Paul Fowler
Chair in Translational Medical Sciences, Director of Institute of Medical Science, University of Aberdeen
“Exposure to the complex mixture of environmental chemicals found in human biosolids”
Following Dr. Fowler’s BSc Hons and PhD in Zoology, Professor Fowler worked on ovarian hormones in Obstetrics & Gynaecology, University of Aberdeen. In 2000, he moved to the University of Aberdeen’s Institute of Medical Sciences and is currently its Director. His career focus is elucidating mechanisms regulating reproduction. Since the new century, his research has focused on effects of environmental exposures and endocrine disruption on fetal development and health in human and animal models. His main model is the normal first and second trimester human fetus. He set up the FeGo (Fetal Gonad) and then SAFeR (Scottish Advanced Fetal Research) studies focusing on the normal first and second trimester human fetus. His work on real-life effects of biosolids on development and function used a sheep model. He is currently involved in 2 major projects on endocrine disruption - PROTECTED and FREIA.
3:05-3:35 pm - Dr. Jyotsna Jagai
Research Assistant Professor in the Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago
“Cumulative environmental quality and diabetes rates and control”
Jyotsna S. Jagai, MS, MPH, PhD is an environmental epidemiologist whose work focuses primarily on the impact of cumulative environmental exposures on health outcomes and health inequities. To this end she has worked on the development of comprehensive indicators to characterize the cumulative environmental impact on human health. She has utilized this indicator to look at relationships with various health outcomes. She is interested in expanding this work to assess finer geographic resolution, explore biomarkers as indicators of cumulative environmental exposures and use of various factor reduction methods. In addition, her methodological work includes time series analysis, meta-analysis methods, and development of metrics of cumulative exposures.
3:35-4:00 pm - Panel Discussion, featuring:
Dr. Jennifer McPartland
Senior Scientist, Health Program, Environmental Defense Fund
As Senior Scientist in the Health program at Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), Dr. Jennifer McPartland focuses on advancing policy, market, and science solutions to protect human health and the environment from harmful chemical exposures. Jennifer supports EDF’s efforts to ensure health protective implementation of the Toxics Substances Control Act (TSCA), the main U.S. chemicals law, by working to build strong chemical review and management processes at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Dr. McPartland is the lead technical advisor for EDF+Business initiatives focused on consumer health. In this capacity, Jennifer has worked with major companies including Walmart to develop corporate chemical management frameworks. She also helped create EDF’s online platform, Behind the Label, to share insights and recommendations on business leadership in chemicals innovation and management. Jennifer also collaborates with multiple EDF programs to assess and address public health issues associated with the oil and gas industry. She currently serves on the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Environmental Health Matters Initiative Committee, the U.S. EPA’s Board of Scientific Counselors Chemical Safety for Sustainability Subcommittee, and the GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals Science Advisory Committee. Before her arrival at EDF, Jennifer was an American Society of Microbiology (ASM)/American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) congressional science policy fellow for Congresswoman Diana DeGette. Her portfolio focused on health and consumer issues ranging from direct-to-consumer genetic testing and food safety to chemicals policy reform. Dr. McPartland earned her PhD, and was a postdoctoral researcher, at the University of Chicago where she pursued research in the field of microbiology in the lab of Dr. Lucia Rothman-Denes. Jennifer received a BS in chemistry with a specialization in biochemistry from the University of Virginia.
Dr. Natalie Sampson
Associate Professor of Environmental Health at UM-Dearborn
Natalie Sampson PhD, MPH teaches courses in environmental health, community organizing, and health promotion. Grounded primarily in Southeast Michigan, she studies transportation and land use planning, stormwater infrastructure, vacant land reuse, and climate change planning efforts, particularly their implications for health. She conducts participatory and action-oriented research with community and government partners using a broad methodological toolkit, including photovoice, concept mapping, and health impact assessment. She is the co-founder of the Environmental Health Research-to-Action Youth Academy with community and academic partners to build intergenerational capacity in community science and policy advocacy to address environmental racism. In 2017, Dr. Sampson received the American Public Health Association’s Rebecca Head Award, which recognizes “an outstanding emerging leader from the environmental field working at the nexus of science, policy, and environmental justice.” In 2019, she received the Carol Hollenshead Inspire Award for Excellence in Promoting Equity and Social Change. Dr. Sampson holds a Bachelor of Science from U-M’s School of Natural Resources and the Environment (now U-M SEAS), an MPH from Portland State University, and a PhD from U-M’s School of Public Health. She is the Chair-Elect of the American Public Health Association's Environment Section.
Dr. Zorimar Rivera-Núñez
Assistant Research Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at Rutgers.
Dr. Rivera-Núñez holds a BS in Microbiology and a MS in Environmental Health Sciences from the University of Puerto Rico. Her doctoral degree is from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI. She completed a National Academies post-doctoral fellowships at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Cincinnati, OH. Before coming to Rutgers she was on the faculty at Washington University in St. Louis, Brown School, Public Health Program. Dr. Rivera-Núñez studies chemical exposures and its effects in early life and subsequent health. Most of her research focuses on: (1) effect of measurement error characterizing environmental exposure, (2) the utility of biomarkers identifying windows of exposure and susceptibility, and (3) the effect of perinatal exposures in birth outcomes and children’s development.
This Feb 12, 2021 01:00 PM event is scheduled for 3 hours in Eastern Time.
Tue January 26 2021 • 12:00 PM — 12:50 PM
M-LEEaD CEC and IHSC Webinar Series: “Environmental Health Priorities in South East Michigan: Community Engagement Core and Stakeholder Advocacy Board”
Description: Speakers: Ricky Ackerman (Eastside Community Network); Jaye Clement (Henry Ford Health System); Yolanda Hill-Ashford (Detroit Health Department); Monica Lewis- Patrick (We the People of Detroit); Michelle Martinez (Michigan Environmental Justice Coalition); Angela Reyes (Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation); Kathryn Savoie (Ecology Center); Sherita Smith (Grandmont Rosedale Development Corporation); Felix Valbuena, Jr. (Community Health and Social Services); Barbara Israel (University of Michigan School of Public Health); Natalie Sampson (University of Michigan-Dearborn); Amy Schulz (University of Michigan School of Public Health)
Tue November 24 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Environmental Research Seminar: “The Impact of COVID-19 on Service Workers” with Marie-Anne Rosemberg (UM Schl of Nursing)
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Integrated Health Sciences Core
Tue November 10 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Environmental Research Seminar: “Of Moms and Microbes: Pregnancy and the Microbiome” with Kimberly McKee, PhD (Assistant Professor, Family Medicine, UM Medical School)
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Integrated Health Sciences Core
Fri October 23 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Environmental Statistics Week: “A Spatiotemporal Epidemiological Prediction Model to Inform County-level COVID-19 Risks in the USA” with Peter Song (UM SPH)
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Integrated Health Sciences Core
Thu October 22 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Environmental Statistics Week: “Environmental Cadmium, Mortality from Influenza and Pneumonia in U.S. Adults” with Sung Kyun Park (UM SPH)
Description: There is an urgent need to identify modifiable risk factors that may predispose individuals with COVID-19 to developing worsening pneumonia and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). This is particularly important given the continued absence of anti-viral agents with proven efficacy and the uncertain timeline of vaccine development. Mounting epidemiologic evidence has identified some personal characteristics that are associated with worse outcomes, one of them is cigarette smoking. Cadmium is a major toxicant in inhaled cigarette smoke. Environmental cadmium exposure is widespread and happens through not only active and passive smoking but diet. In humans, it is poorly excreted, triggers pulmonary inflammation, reduces pulmonary function, and enhances lung injury. In this talk, I will present my recent study of the association of cadmium burden with mortality related to influenza or pneumonia using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and discuss implications in COVID-19.
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Integrated Health Sciences Core
Wed October 21 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Environmental Statistics Week: “COVID-19 Treatment and Outcomes: Registries and Real-World Evidence” with Emily Somers (UM Med Schl Int Med-Rheumatology)
Description: This talk will summarize experiences with the MICHR COVID-19 Rapid Response Registry and the International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium. The role of observational data for evaluating treatments will be considered, and research findings from our registry will be highlighted, including our study of IL-6 inhibition with tocilizumab in patients with severe COVID-19.
Documents: Slides from “COVID-19 Treatment and Outcomes: Registries and Real-World Evidence” (PDF)
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Integrated Health Sciences Core
Tue October 20 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Environmental Statistics Week: “Learning from COVID-19 Data in Wuhan, USA, and the World on Transmission, Interventions, and Infection” with Xihong Lin (Harvard)
Description: COVID-19 is an emerging respiratory infectious disease that has become a pandemic. In this talk, I will first provide a historical overview of the epidemic in Wuhan. I will provide the analysis results of 32,000 lab-confirmed COVID-19 cases in Wuhan to estimate transmission rates, the multi-faceted public health intervention effects that helped Wuhan control the COVID-19 outbreak, and epidemiological characteristics of the cases. I will present the results using the transmission dynamic model to show the two features of the COVID-19 epidemic: high transmissibility and high covertness, and a high proportion of undetected cases, including asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic cases, and the chances of resurgence in different scenarios. I will next present the epidemic models to estimate the transmission rates in USA and other countries and intervention effects. I will present methods and analysis results of >500,000 participants of the HowWeFeel project on symptoms and health conditions in US, and discuss the factors associated with who have been tested in US and COVID-19 infection. I will provide several takeaways learned from the pandemic and discuss priorities.
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Integrated Health Sciences Core
Mon October 19 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Environmental Statistics Week: “COVID-19 and Racial/Ethnic Disparities: Assessing Treatments Effects in Hospitalized Patients from Underrepresented Minority Groups” with Yanxun Xu (Johns Hopkins)
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Integrated Health Sciences Core
Wed October 7 2020 • 1:00 PM — 3:00 PM
“A Virtual Event: Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS): Exposure, Toxicity, and Policy”
Description: Registration is required. Speakers: 1) Elsie Sunderland, PhD (Harvard); 2) Jamie DeWitt, PhD (Eastern Carolina University); 3) Steve Sliver, Michigan PFAS Action Response Team (MPART), Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE).
Tue October 6 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Environmental Research Seminar: “Wearable Microsystem for Direct Measurement of Multi-VOC (Worker) Exposures” with Ted Zellers (UM SPH EHS)
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Integrated Health Sciences Core
Tue September 22 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Environmental Statistics Discussion: “Micro-randomized Trials in Mobile Health” with Zhenke Wu, PhD (Assistant Professor of Biostatistics Research Assistant Professor, Michigan Institute of Data Sciences (MIDAS))
Documents: Assessing Real-Time Moderation for Developing Adaptive Mobile Health Interventions for Medical Interns: Micro-Randomized Trial (PDF) from the Journal of medical Internet research; The Micro-Randomized Trial for Developing Digital Interventions: Data Analysis Methods (PDF);
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Integrated Health Sciences Core
Tue September 8 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
IHSC Introductory Seminar: “What is the Integrated Health Sciences Core and What Can It Do For Me?”
Description: An introduction to the IHSC with Marie O’Neill, PhD (Professor, Environmental Health Sciences and Epidemiology), Daniel McConnell, PhD (Director, Central Ligand Assay Satellite Services (CLASS) laboratory), Lu Wang, PhD (Professor, Biostatistics), Trish Koman, PhD (Research Investigator, Environmental Health Sciences), Sung Kyun Park, ScD (Associate Professor, Environmental Health Sciences and Epidemiology)
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Integrated Health Sciences Core
Mon August 10 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Summer Omics Learning Seminar Series: “Exposomics and Precision Medicine: Everything that Rises Must Converge” with Robert O. Wright, MD, MPH (Ethel H Wise Professor and Chair; Department of Environmental Medicine; Director, Institute for Exposomic Research; Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)
Description: Exposomics is the study of all the health relevant environmental exposures across a lifetime, and is the great unmet challenge in medical science. Exposomics is unique in that it includes external and internal measures of exposure, as well as being time varying. There have been exponential advances in measuring the exposome in the last decade. In this lecture the convergence of exposomics and precision medicine will be presented and a proposal advanced to incorporate environmental measures into precision medicine initiatives.

A small group discussion will take place after the lecture at 1 pm EST. Please indicate your interest in the registration form if you are interested in participating.

This webinar is part of the Summer Omics Learning (SOL) Series presented by the Omics and Bioinformatics Core (OBIC) of our Michigan Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Center at the University of Michigan. Please note that you must register using your institutional email address. If you have questions, please contact Katie Zarins (kmrents@umich.edu).
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD)
Mon July 27 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Summer Omics Learning Seminar Series: “Transposable elements and epigenome evolution” with Ting Wang, PhD (Inaugural Sanford and Karen Loewentheil Distinguished Professor of Medicine; Department of Genetics; Washington University School of Medicine)
Description: Transposable elements (TE) make up about half of our genome, yet they are understudied due to their repetitive nature and are called “junk DNA”. However, they are an abundant and rich genetic resource of regulatory sequences. Modern genomics provided us an opportunity to interrogate their contribution to genome and epigenome evolution. I will discuss advances made over the last decade in recognizing TE’s role in innovating gene regulatory networks, and more recent surprising findings illustrating how TEs provide genetic redundancy in maintaining 3D genome architecture, and how TE’s deregulation accelerate cancer epigenome evolution

A small group discussion will take place after the lecture at 1 pm EST. Please indicate your interest in the registration form if you are interested in participating.

This webinar is part of the Summer Omics Learning (SOL) Series presented by the Omics and Bioinformatics Core (OBIC) of our Michigan Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Center at the University of Michigan. Please note that you must register using your institutional email address. If you have questions, please contact Katie Zarins (kmrents@umich.edu).
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD)
Tue June 30 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:00 PM
Summer Omics Learning Seminar Series: “Implications of human microbiome research for epidemiology and public health” with Betsy Foxman, PhD (Professor, Epidemiology; Director, Center for Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases; University of Michigan School of Public Health)
Description: Applications of high throughput ‘omics technologies to the microbes living in and on humans (the microbiota) are rapidly changing our perspectives of the importance of microbiota to human health. If microbiota enhance or reduce the effects of pathogens, drugs or other exposures on the host, we might manipulate the microbiota for our benefit. Alternatively, or in addition, microbiota might respond to exposure-induced changes in host functions, and thus microbiota characteristics could be used as a diagnostic or prognostic tool. I will provide examples of ongoing epidemiologic studies of the human microbiome, and comment on the promise and challenges of the microbiome for Epidemiology and Public Health.

Following the webinar, there will be a separate small-group discussion from 1 - 2 pm EST. If you are interested in attending, please indicate your interest in the question below. You will receive an invitation email with separate Zoom details prior to the event.

This webinar is part of the Summer Omics Learning (SOL) Series presented by the Omics and Bioinformatics Core (OBIC) of our Michigan Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD) Center at the University of Michigan. Please note that you must register using your institutional email address. If you have questions, please contact Katie Zarins (kmrents@umich.edu).
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD)
Thu June 11 2020 • 6:30 PM — 8:00 PM
Film Screening + Online Panel Discussion: “Cooked: Survival by Zipcode”
Event Webpage: https://www.dptv.org/2020/cooked-survival-by-zipcode-live-panel-discussion/
Description: “COOKED: Survival by ZIP Code” is a documentary by Peabody Award winning filmmaker, Judith Helfand, chronicling the deadly 1995 Chicago heat wave - in which 739 mostly Black, elderly, and poor Chicagoans died during the course of one week. Watch the film for free and join us for a panel discussion with Judith Helfand, Director/Producer of COOKED; Jalonne White-Newsome, Senior Program Officer, Kresge Foundation; Trish Koman, Research Investigator, University of Michigan, School of Public Health; and Justin Onwenu, Environmental Justice Organizer, Sierra Club. The panel will be moderated by Donele Wilkins, President/CEO, Green Door Initiative

Click here to watch the film, enter screener code “36f1bf89”. The film will be available for free through Thursday, June 11, 2020.

Click here to join the panel discussion on Thursday, June 11 from 6:30PM to 8:00PM.
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD); City of Detroit Health Department; We the People of Detroit; Future Insights Consulting; Eastside Community Network; Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice; Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation; Michigan Environmental Justice Coalition; Grandmont Rosedale Development Corporation; Community Health and Social Services Center; Henry Ford Health System; Ecology Center
Wed May 27 2020 • 3:00 PM — 4:30 PM
Webinar: “Assessing the Health Impacts of DTE’s 15-Year Energy Plan”
Event Webpage: https://www.facebook.com/events/3224626377548870/
Description: In 2019, the Michigan Environmental Justice Coalition teamed up with researchers at the University of Michigan to quantify expected health impacts of DTE's coal and gas-based 15-year energy plan.

Data presented helped persuade the Public Service Commission’s top legal advisor to recommend rejection of DTE's plan, and call for Health Impact Assessments (HIAs) to be used in energy planning.

In the context of COVID-19, we are seeing every day how environmental racism is exacerbated in crisis. Meanwhile, the Public Service Commission has declined to issue a Moratorium on energy shutoffs, leaving the same communities impacted by pollution from DTE’s coal and gas plants vulnerable to going without lights, heat, charged cell phones, and stocked refrigerators.

In this webinar, we'll discuss how Health Impact Assessments can – and should – be used to grant greater decision-making power to impacted communities, and advance public planning toward healthy communities.

The panel will feature Dr. Amy Schulz, Dr. Carina Gronlund, Dr. Tony Reames, and Michelle Martinez. We're so grateful to have Planet Detroit publisher Nina Ignaczak joining us as the moderator. Click here for more information about this event.
Sponsored by: Michigan Environmental Justice Coalition, Work For Me DTE!, Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD), National Institutes of Health; co-sponsored by: Soulardarity, We Want Green Too, Sierra Club, Clean Water Action, Empower Michigan, We the People of Detroit, Michigan Environmental Council, Michigan Energy Efficiency for All, Michigan Interfaith Power & Light, Citizens Resistance At Fermi 2, and East Michigan Environmental Action Council.
Tue March 24 2020 • 4:00 PM — 6:30 PM CANCELED
This film screening has been canceled.
Film Screening: “Cooked: Survival by Zipcode (Ann Arbor screening)”
Event Webpage: https://sph.umich.edu/events/event.php?ID=8376
Description: Attend the screening of an award-winning film that explores the politics of disaster response and racial equity in the age of climate change by way of the deadly 1995 Chicago heat wave, in which 739 residents perished in mostly Black and poor neighborhoods of Chicago. Will be followed by small panel (TBD).
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD)
Wed March 18 2020 • 6:00 PM — 8:00 PM CANCELED
This film screening has been canceled.
Film Screening: “Cooked: Survival by Zipcode (Detroit screening)”
Description: Attend the screening of an award-winning film that explores the politics of disaster response and racial equity in the age of climate change by way of the deadly 1995 Chicago heat wave, in which 739 residents perished in mostly Black and poor neighborhoods of Chicago. Will be followed by small panel with Judith Helfand, Director/Producer of COOKED, Trish Koman, Research Investigator, University of Michigan, School of Public Health, Justin Onwenu, Environmental Justice Organizer, Sierra Club, Jalonne White-Newsome, Senior Program Officer, Kresge Foundation.
Sponsored by: Michigan Center on Lifestage Environmental Exposures and Disease (M-LEEaD)
Tue March 10 2020 • 12:00 PM — 1:30 PM
Environmental Practice Workshop: “Climate Change and Health: Readiness and Resilience” with Renee N. Salas, MD, MPH, MS (Yerby Fellow, Harvard Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment (C-CHANGE); Emergency Medical Physician, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School)
Event Webpage: http://mleead.umich.edu/Event_Climate_Change_and_Health_2020.php
Description: OUR CLIMATE IS OUR PLANET’S LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEM. Climate change influences human health and disease in numerous ways. Some existing health threats will intensify and new health threats will emerge. Not everyone is equally at risk, and children are especially at risk. Preventive and adaptive actions are needed.

OUR KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Dr. Renee N. Salas, is an emergency medicine physician who co-authored the U.S. portion of the Lancet Countdown report and Health and Care Delivery in the New England Journal of Medicine. A panel of experts will present solutions from a variety of other universities who are reducing their carbon footprint in response to the urgent public health need. Dr. Salas will present the keynote address “Climate Action: Children’s Health Drives Need for Urgent Action”.

Please go to http://mleead.umich.edu/Event_Climate_Change_and_Health_2020.php for more information.